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Civilization IV: Warlords Review by Solver

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  • Civilization IV: Warlords Review by Solver

    Civilization IV: Warlords Review by Solver

    Warlords, the first expansion pack for the highly-successful Civilization IV has just been released. I am going to take a look at how the gameplay has changed with the expansion's release, and at how the new major features blend in.


    Civer, Meet Warlords!

    Most of you probably already know what's new in Warlords at a glance. Other than six new scenarios, the expansion pack offers six new civs and a total of ten new leaders. These would be the Ottomans (led by Mehmed II), the Koreans (Wang Kon), the Celts (Brennus), the Vikings (Ragnar), the Carthaginians (Hannibal) and the Zulus (Shaka). Additionally, some of the old civs received new leaders – Ramesses II, Stalin, Winston Churchill and Augustus Caesar.

    More interesting than the leaders themselves are the new traits. There's whole three of them, not two, as had been originally said. They are:

    • Charismatic: +1 happiness, +1 happiness from Monuments and Broadcast Towers. -25% XP required for unit promotions.
    • Imperialistic: +100% Great General emergence, +50% Settler production.
    • Protective: Free City Garrison I and Drill I for Archery and Gunpowder units. Double production speed for Walls and Castles.

    These traits have not only been assigned to the new civilizations and leaders, but the old ones have also been reshuffled. For example, Tokugawa, formerly Aggressive/Organized, now gets the interesting combination of Aggressive/Protective. Thus, the new traits are not underrepresented.

    And let's not forget the two other major features of Warlords – vassal states and Great Generals. These will be covered later in the review.

     
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