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  • Logistics

    The topic of logistics is hardly ever seen in strategy games, where it's all about tactics, tactics, and more tactics. Does anyone know of any games that put the focus on logistics, supply lines, economics, and the like?
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  • #2
    IIRC RON had some logistics stuff but probably not to the extend you are looking for.
    Who is Barinthus?

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    • #3
      Operational Ar of War 2, i think, has a supply element. It still quite tactical though from what i remember - another game on my 'to play' pile.

      Some of the Panzer General series had a basic supply element - fuel & ammo and penalties for being 'out of supply'.

      SOmething like Imperialism 2 has a large element of economics and supply on a strategic scale.

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      • #4
        Best bet is to ask the wargamers.

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        • #5
          Re: Logistics

          Originally posted by Smiley
          The topic of logistics is hardly ever seen in strategy games, where it's all about tactics, tactics, and more tactics. Does anyone know of any games that put the focus on logistics, supply lines, economics, and the like?
          What about Capitalism? Does that count?
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          • #6
            Well, does it have a focus on logistics, supply lines, economics, and the like?

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            • #7
              The Operational Art of War (TOAW) series.

              HoI

              Korsun Pocket

              And probably the most complex game ever made, War in the pacific.
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              • #8
                KOHAN:Immortal Soverigns has a focus on supply lines... sort of.

                If your units aren't within the supply zone of a city or outpost, they can't regenerate.

                And generally KOHAN is a great game, so I suggest that you purchase it!

                (I picked it up for christmas- the original version, not the expansion) It's much different from a regular RTS. Buildings have continual resource maintenance costs instead of lump sum- so there's never any downtime!
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                • #9
                  Kohan's not a bad game, but it most certainly does not meet the requirements.

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                  • #10
                    Korsun's Pocket is supposed to be a fantastic game. But I've been reluctant to purchase wargames. I'm not sure if I'd like them. Is there a demo out for these games. What about a demo for operational art of war? That's supposed to be real good as well. But I've never really played detailed war games such as that.

                    I find too much micromanagement to be tedius. Like the Red Front scenario for Civ2. Far too many units to move around.

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                    • #11
                      Hearts of Iron 2 is said to have a sophisticated logistics model.

                      M.A.X. also had micro-manage level logistics, where everything needed to be resuplied with ammo. (and fuel?)
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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DrSpike
                        Well, does it have a focus on logistics, supply lines, economics, and the like?
                        It's mainly an economy game, buying material, making and selling widgets. So I'd say yes.
                        (\__/) 07/07/1937 - Never forget
                        (='.'=) "Claims demand evidence; extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence." -- Carl Sagan
                        (")_(") "Starting the fire from within."

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                        • #13
                          Transport Tycoon is mainly about logistics.
                          Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Urban Ranger


                            It's mainly an economy game, buying material, making and selling widgets. So I'd say yes.
                            Well then to answer your earlier question, yes.

                            Glad to be of service.

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                            • #15
                              Seems there are two aspects to logistics, broadly speaking. 1.Economics - what to do we build, and how, and how do we keep the economy going during (and even prior to) war. 2. The other is how do we keep troops in the field supplied - A. How do we keep supply lines open B. How do we allocated supplies, ensure we have enough assets to transport supplies, protect them, etc.


                              1 is the realm of the civilian leaders, 2a is the realm of the combat officers at any level above tactical, and 2b is the realm of the supply and logistics officers.

                              1, economics broadly is found generally in grand strategy games - Axis and Allies, Third Reich, the Paradox games - and, in a different fashion, in the imperialisms. And, in a less realistic, but still sometimes interesting fashion, in 4X games like Civ. and, in a more cartoonish fashion, in RTS games.

                              2A and 2B - is generally NOT handled outside "wargames" properly so-called, (im not familiar with how paradox games handles this)

                              One constant challenge is how to handle 2a without burdening the player with the micromanagement of 2b - you want players to avoid doing unrealist things like moving an army without regard for protecting its supply lines, but you dont want players (in most games) to have to worry about allocating trucks, and so forth. Different wargames offer different solutions.

                              At a strategic level you may sometimes WANT to have 2b be central. Im currently reading Churchill on WW2, and its striking the extent to which the constraining factor on both sides was shipping. A WW2 strat game that doesnt reflect that is unrealistic, even if its more "fun".

                              PG2 solution is a combination of supply, replacements, and reinforcements based on prestige points. While it works well as a gameplay device, its not particularly realistic. In particular you can be resupplied even when surrounded (IIRC) as long as youre not in direct contact with the enemy. Civil War General also allowed resupply without reference to open Lines of Communication, though it didnt do the prestige thing.

                              Im not familiar enough with enough recent war games to discuss how they handle them.

                              City builders and tycoon games often get into the details of supply and transport, but I assume you mean in the context of armed conflict.
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