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  • Get It Name Right!

    I was in a software store and on the box for Alphha Centuri it had

    "The Future of Mind"

    Why cant they just get it to say "The Future of Mankind!" Is it that hard ?
    Proud member of The Human Hive, working for a better future on Chiron, today!

  • #2
    Where was the software store? In a non-English-speaking country, getting"The Future of Mankind" might be hard.

    Also, I hate to point out errors like this, but you wrote

    Get It Name Right!
    in the thread title, but on the first line you have

    Alphha Centuri
    which I assume you didn't do on purpose.
    Everything changes, but nothing is truly lost.

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    • #3
      Beaten with a Lipstick I assume
      Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!

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      • #4
        Translations of "The Future of Mankind" from English obtained at http://babelfish.altavista.com/translate.dyn
        • En Français: Le futur de l'humanité
        • Auf Deutsch: Die Zukunft der Menschheit
        • In Italiano: Il futuro di umanità
        • Em Português: O futuro da humanidade
        • En Español: El futuro de la humanidad
        Chinese, Japanese, and Korean are also available, but I can't copy-and-paste the characters here. They are all replaced by question marks No point being made, just killing time
        I am on a mission to see how much coffee it takes to actually achieve time travel. :frantic:

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        • #5
          Looks like the only one babelfish got wrong is the italian one.
          In the 4 others it correctly reported the genitive case reference with preposition AND article, which it failed to do in italian.

          de l'
          der (here only the article is used, 'of' is expressed by the genitive declension)
          da (in portuguese the form is *extremely* contrapted )
          de la

          correct italian form is
          Il futuro dell'umanità

          Babelfish form indeed sounds rather illiterate to a native italian speaker, or maybe like a comic german or russian movie character would say it

          BTW, what was it all about???
          I don't exactly know what I mean by that, but I mean it (Holden Caulfield)

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          • #6
            Babelfish looks great.

            Any idea how/where to translate English into Japanese in english alphabet?
            "I'm so happy I could go and drive a car crash!"
            "What do you mean do I rape strippers too? Is that an insult?"
            - Pekka

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            • #7
              Any idea how/where to translate English into Japanese in english alphabet?
              Try one of the online translators.

              BTW It could have been a typo : Future of Mankind
              ... This body holding me reminds me of my own mortality...
              ... Pain is an illusion...

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              • #8
                Wrong translations are great. Anyone remember the Jurassic Park arcade game? It had great quotes like "Make dinosaur become quiet and escape island."
                "Luck's last match struck in the pouring down wind." - Chris Cornell, "Mindriot"

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                • #9
                  And then of course there's the old favorite "All your base . . ."
                  Everything changes, but nothing is truly lost.

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                  • #10
                    Looks like the only one babelfish got wrong is the italian one.
                    The French version probably had been better
                    L'avenir de l'humanité
                    (although I'm not the ultimate expert in French) - "futur" as a noun seems to be the grammatical term only.
                    German is correct.
                    And about the Italian, it is a bitter revenge to what Italian translators did do to other languages. Only one example: On a glass of pesto sauce, the usual "best before end:" reads in German "Am besten vor Datum auf Fertigkleidung" (put it preferably before date on confectioned clothes). I'm still thinking hard about how they arrived at this translation - maybe the italian "confezione" means also "label".
                    Why doing it the easy way if it is possible to do it complicated?

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                    • #11
                      As somebody said: verbing wierds language.
                      (\__/) Save a bunny, eat more Smurf!
                      (='.'=) Sponsored by the National Smurfmeat Council
                      (")_(") Smurf, the original blue meat! © 1999, patent pending, ® and ™ (except that "Smurf" bit)

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                      • #12
                        ROTFL
                        Yeah, that's why I usually refuse to buy italian localisations of english games!

                        'Confezione' only very vaguely refers to clothes, it might be maybe only its 4th or 5th meaning, hinting to the tailoring process of a suit (and in such case a high-fashion connotation is intended, or... made believe! ).
                        It more simply means both "manifacturing" (not exactly in industrial sense, but rather craftmanship) or "packaging". The latter being the everyday use.

                        In printed messages, it is used becaus it gives a more technical impression than simply saying "on the box"

                        I'm still thinking hard about how they arrived at this translation
                        I might answer you, as I "might imagine" how an italian could have reasoned

                        Am besten = at best
                        vor Datum = before the date
                        auf Fertigkleidung = ....

                        well, this is harder
                        first, I guess that "an der" could have been grammatically better than simply "auf"
                        then, to a german-stuttering italian, "Fertigkleidung" sounds like "final dress", but in this context it was for sure interpreted as "final/outer cover/wrap/envelope" as in "at the end of the packaging process you 'dress' or cover the glass bottle with a plastic film or paper label... "

                        Thus:
                        "at best before the date on packaging"...
                        I know, it's funny, but then you should search the web for "engrish"

                        BTW, which would be the correct, natural german way to say "best before end:" ?

                        PS: in italian, while pesto IS a sauce, you never say "pesto sauce". You can have a "tomato sauce", but "pesto" defines in itself the fact that it's a sauce.
                        Just like you don't say "mayo sauce" or "ketchup sauce" when you want to refer to plain mayonnaise or ketchup themselves...

                        Back on topic (),
                        Il futuro della razza umana (human race rather than mankind)
                        wold have sounded maybe less literary but more technically precise...
                        I don't exactly know what I mean by that, but I mean it (Holden Caulfield)

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                        • #13
                          Ich bin ein Berliner!
                          "Love the earth and sun and animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown . . . reexamine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency" - Walt Whitman

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                          • #14
                            Suomeksi: Ihmiskunnan tulevaisuus
                            Cake and grief counseling will be available at the conclusion of the test. Thank you for helping us help you help us all!

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                            • #15
                              das ist mine offa (think I spelled that right)
                              "Luck's last match struck in the pouring down wind." - Chris Cornell, "Mindriot"

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