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  • CivRev Previews

    I decided to start a new thread dedicated to the previews for Civilization: Revolutions.

    I'll start with an IGN preview late last month.

    http://ps3.ign.com/articles/814/814912p1.html

    August 22, 2007 - We've been anxious for more details on Sid Meier's Civilization: Revolution ever since we first saw the game at E3 so it's lucky for us that Scott Lewis and Tim McCracken from Firaxis are here at the German Games Convention to show off a bit more of the game. This time around, the presentation revealed more details on combat, the use of spies, wonders and artifacts, as well as giving us a brief look at the new trophy room.

    We'd already seen the lively and dynamic combat animations but we hadn't seen exactly how the combat works under the hood. With his Roman army stationed outside an Egyptian city (and against Scott's protests) Tim decided to attack the Egyptians. Just before committing to the battle, two windows pop up showing the armies' relative strengths and bonuses. The defenders gain cumulative bonuses for fortification and the presence of a great general and a palace.

    To even the odds, Tim sent in a spy unit to actually steal the enemy general and bring it over to his side. Now that he had the general (and his enemy had lost it) Tim had basically doubled his effectiveness against the enemy. He could add more bonuses in his favor by bringing naval units adjacent to the battle. This not only adds to the options an attacker has when attacking a city, but also adds real teeth to the naval game.

    Scott pointed out that the triremes in the game are particularly touchy targets. Having no defense whatsoever, they're a sure victory for your side -- as long as you're willing to become the aggressor. Predicting just when your opponents are about to declare war on you will definitely be the key to your success when using this strategy.

    Units that defeat units of equal or greater strength automatically become eligible for promotions and there were a few more revealed this time around. The Blitz promotion grants units an extra move after a successful attack and the March promotion allows a unit to move twice per turn. Again, the possibilities of combining these bonuses in a three-unit army seem even more attractive.

    After indulging his warlike tendencies, Tim completed work on his Oracle at Delphi wonder, which granted him knowledge of a nearby ancient artifact, the Ark of the Covenant. These ancient relics are very powerful items that should encourage players to explore the world around them. The player who claims the Ark, for instance, immediately gets free temples and cathedrals in all of his or her existing cities. Scott explained that this is actually one of the weaker artifacts in the game so we're excited to see what else they'll be able to do.

    We also managed to get a look at the trophy room. In appreciation of Tim's destruction of a barbarian village, Prince Hector of Phoenicia sent him some amazing acrobats. You can view the acrobats doing their tricks in the throne room at any time you want. We didn't get to see much else in the throne room beyond a group of dancing girls. And honestly, once you find the dancing girls, why are you even looking for something else?

    During the course of the demo we also managed to confirm that Alexander the Great and Isabella are both in the game.

    Civilization: Revolution is due out next Spring for Xbox 360, PS3 and DS and the following Fall for Wii.


    Some of these this news is very interesting. The artifacts are really intriguing and I hope they aren't as completely game unbalancing as they appear.
    I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
    - John 13:34-35 (NRSV)

  • #2
    Dancing girls...

    Imbalancing artifacts...

    Combined arms bonusi...

    More fun with spies...

    Combat units with defense rating zero...

    Actually that last one is confusing. Does this mean units are going to have seperate attack and defense ratings?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Kinjiru
      Actually that last one is confusing. Does this mean units are going to have seperate attack and defense ratings?
      I believe that is what it means... or the triremes are special units in that their battle rating only applies for attack.
      I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
      - John 13:34-35 (NRSV)

      Comment


      • #4
        Pro-G from the Good Ole UK has come up with their own preview that reveals some interesting information:

        http://www.pro-g.co.uk/ps3/civilizat...eview-622.html

        Sid Meier's Civilization games have a reputation for anything but humour and tongue-in-cheek wit. Instead they are famed as deep, involving god games with a seriousness and complexity anchored deep in the pursuit of realism.

        Which all makes Civilization Revolution a thoroughly pleasant surprise, as it takes the world of Civilization and remixes it into a decidedly easy going pastiche of the original game. From the outset it appears to be what might be best described as 'CIV Light', to use some jargon from the snack foods industry.

        What strikes you first about Civilization Revolution is the visual flair. Compared to the more traditional instalments in the series, Revolution is bold, bright, and clearly inspired by games that are presented through cartoon imagery and deformed scale. Of course all Civilization games have at the heart of their signature style a huge disproportion between the landscapes and the buildings and characters that inhabit them, meaning Revolution's exaggerated imbalance of scale could be understood as sly self-referencing.

        If this kind of in-joke is commonplace then there should be something there for the diehard Civilization fan to enjoy, as without, the game mechanics demonstrated so far point to a title pitched squarely at those unfamiliar with the intricacies of the genre, which would likely upset most established Civilization players.

        The template though, mimics that of the classic Civilization very closely. Starting at the dawn of civilised man's time on the planet, you must select one of 16 classic empires to command, including the likes of the Romans, the Egyptians, the Greeks and the Mongols. Focussing on combat, research, and ultimately expansion, you must take your tribe all the way to the space race.

        At first you must defeat any uncivilised nations that populate your area, before moving on to establish technologies and propagate your culture. Interactions with NPCs and other civilisations are done through a simple conversation system that also allows you to decide who to attack and who to defend.

        As always, either diplomacy or warmongering can be used to progress, though of course the fun to be had lies firmly with the latter. So far we're essentially looking at the basics of any Civilization game, which is of course exactly what this is. The real distinction only really comes in the presentation, and the lightened list of game rules and adjustable factors.

        Spying, for example, involves sending forth a covert agent to steal secrets and personnel as is the case in the new Civilization expansion pack, but in Revolution your heavily stereotype-laden detective is accompanied by toy piano tip-toe music and mischievous animation.

        The melees too are filled with over-exaggeration and outsized gestures, and become even more ludicrous as you progress, letting you see Roman legions squabble in slapstick fashion with futuristic guards carrying machine guns, again parodying the series' more nonsensical moments. One point for fans of the series here is that for the first time you won't see unrealistic mismatches of firepower. Previously you might have noticed the odd occasion when archers were successfully holding off jet fighters, but now that has been changed, which is rather ironic considering Revolution's general disregard for reality.

        There is still some depth to indulge in, from the aforementioned research, which sees you develop everything from the alphabet to space craft, and features like the ability to race to create wonders of the world, which increase you cultural significance and lure people from other societies to your clan.

        But still, the overall idea here is that the pace, if not the tone, is similar to a typical first hour of a traditional Civilization game throughout the entirety of a Revolution game. That idea is an enticing one, but just who will buy Revolution is unclear. For hardcore god gamers it may just be a little too basic, and for newcomers it may feel a touch too entrenched in the Civilization world.

        Nonetheless it looks incredible fun, and goes someway to revitalising what has become a rather stilted genre. If it truly is smaller and more compact than a typical PC equivalent, it could be a particularly exciting prospect for console owners who feel they have been missing out.


        Sounds intriguing. And some nice self-referential humor as well. I like that they are making fun of themselves by an overexaggerated console version .
        I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
        - John 13:34-35 (NRSV)

        Comment


        • #5
          Two more previews:

          http://ps3.gamespy.com/playstation-3.../816329p1.html
          http://www.psxextreme.com/ps3-previews/104.html

          Not the best articles ever written but some interesting tidbits here and there, such as a description of espionage (did we know that would be in the game?), the UI and apparently the game has an 'overrun' feature which means tanks can overrun lighter troops without losing MP.
          Administrator of WePlayCiv -- Civ5 Info Centre | Forum | Gallery

          Comment


          • #6
            Check this article from Edge Magazine out, located over at FIRAXIS , it has some interesting screenshots.

            Looks like its going to be fun!!!

            Gramps
            Hi, I'm RAH and I'm a Benaholic.-rah

            Comment


            • #7
              Looking forward to this release!

              Gramps
              Last edited by Grandpa Troll; October 7, 2007, 16:15.
              Hi, I'm RAH and I'm a Benaholic.-rah

              Comment


              • #8
                A preview from CVG

                http://www.computerandvideogames.com....php?id=173367

                Not much revealed except some interface and somthing about trade routes.
                USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA!
                The video may avatar is from

                Comment


                • #9
                  Two new previews from IGN and Gamespot.

                  http://xbox360.ign.com/articles/828/828213p1.html

                  http://www.gamespot.com/xbox360/stra...=recent&page=1

                  The city mangaing system gets a descripition and it looks like workers are no longer units. (IGN)

                  There is also alot revealed about the combat system including a retreat button. (Gamespot)
                  USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA! USA!
                  The video may avatar is from

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    From the IGN preview:

                    Outside of the city centers is where things begin to get more interesting. Much of Civ Revolution's early gameplay revolves around exploration. There's a lot more to do than just found new cities in ideal spots and locate barbarian villages to raid. Natural wonders, such as great forests or plains, can be located and named for small rewards. In the map we played, the lost city of Atlantis was out there to be found for a huge cultural and technological bonus.


                    Very cool stuff. I loved similar stuff in SMAC (natural wonders on the map) and I can't wait to see it here.
                    I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
                    - John 13:34-35 (NRSV)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am probably going to be modded for this - but I have to say it. I'm looking for a reason to buy Civ Revolutions - and I think this is probably what it is:

                      This is Civilisation for when you've had a few hits from the bong.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lordrune
                        I am probably going to be modded for this - but I have to say it.
                        Nah, this isn't CFC, as long as you're respectful to others we don't censor people for having opinions


                        An interesting AAR/hands-on preview from a somewhat ignorant reviewer, but with still some interesting comments on the UI:

                        http://www.gamearena.com.au/news/read.php/4492038

                        UI-related excerpts:

                        Controlling your units isnt a complicated task, simply a matter of moving the cursor onto the correct hex and clicking, the game intuitively telling you what you can do on each hex.


                        Giving the city a build command was initially confusing as it wasnt immediately apparent I would have to assign people to do the building, but once I worked that out I was on my way. One thing I do hope they fix is the people assigning section. It utilizes the right stick to select people and it seems foreign. I cant help but think maybe a simple command interface to select people would be easier.


                        This actually highlighted another cool element in the game; the use of the directional pad. If you press right on it the game allows you to talk to any of the rulers youve previously talked to.


                        It seemed like as good a time as any to build a road, so I built a surprisingly modern road through Rome to Joabonia using maybe the most annoying part of the entire game. You need to press and hold A and then press in the direction you want the road to go. I think. I actually never successfully built a road, both times having to get my guide to build it for me. I can only hope it works better in the full game.
                        Administrator of WePlayCiv -- Civ5 Info Centre | Forum | Gallery

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                        • #13
                          Another batch of previews:

                          http://www.next-gen.biz/index.php?op...=7552&Itemid=2

                          http://www.thewiire.com/news/1041/1/...on_Impressions
                          http://previews.teamxbox.com/xbox-36...Revolution/p1/

                          http://www.kotaku.com.au/games/2007/...pressions.html

                          See the news (http://apolyton.net/misc) for quotes.

                          If you only read one of these, read the Edge/Next-Gen one (the first link). Not much new info but man, the difference in quality of writing between online gaming sites and old-fashioned physical magazines sure is big (or is it a British vs American thing? Can't say I read a lot of magazines or British gaming sites)
                          Administrator of WePlayCiv -- Civ5 Info Centre | Forum | Gallery

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