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  • Setting up a Server with Microsoft Server

    I'll admit, I have never done this before, nothing much like it at all. Which I am a little ashamed to say. I guess it's one of those things you only need when you REALLY need one.

    I have been appointed to set up a server in the office.

    My budget is $7500.

    What is the best way to do it and what software and hardware do I need?

    A guy has recommended me an HP server with Microsoft Server 2003, but I thought there was a much later version than 2003. And what does MS Server actually allow me to do? Are there any other applications - server wise - that an office would find useful, for example, Emails, File Transfer, Databases. Would I need additional special software for these kind of things?

    At the moment, I can only think of two primary reasons we would use a server for, 1 is for backup and 2 is for emails (accessing outlook from anywhere, I forget the exact name of the MS app).

    Cheers for any help
    be free

  • #2
    Where to start.

    It's called Windows Server, not Microsoft Server. 2003 is based on Windows XP, 2008 is based on Windows Vista.

    It comes with file transfer and web server support.

    You'd need an email server (if you want to stick MS, the industry standard is Microsoft Exchange Server), and a database server. There's many, many of them. MS' is called Microsoft SQL Server and the latest is 2008.
    "The issue is there are still many people out there that use religion as a crutch for bigotry and hate. Like Ben."
    Ben Kenobi: "That means I'm doing something right. "

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    • #3
      Thanks.

      Can Microsoft Exchange Server be installed on the back of Microsoft Server 2008? I don't want two damn servers!

      Is it worth getting 2008 or 2003?
      be free

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      • #4
        Windows Server is the OS.

        Database servers, exchange servers, etc are just applications that run in the Server OS.

        And I don't know much of the difference between 2008 and 2003, I don't do IT
        "The issue is there are still many people out there that use religion as a crutch for bigotry and hate. Like Ben."
        Ben Kenobi: "That means I'm doing something right. "

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        • #5
          If you're in a Vista environment, get 2008. If you're in an XP environment, get 2003.
          <Reverend> IRC is just multiplayer notepad.
          I like your SNOOPY POSTER! - While you Wait quote.

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          • #6
            We just bought a Dell rack server at my work. It was very cheap (for server-grade hardware), and good quality.
            http://www.hardware-wiki.com - A wiki about computers, with focus on Linux support.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by FrostyBoy
              Thanks.

              Can Microsoft Exchange Server be installed on the back of Microsoft Server 2008? I don't want two damn servers!
              Yes, exchange installs like any other app. As you seem to only have light requirements, it's probably not an issue to install it onto the same server, but you may find that if you expand you'd want to separate it off pretty quick.

              Exchange 2007 is 64bit only, so make sure your vendor supplies you the 64bit version of the OS. Exchange 2003 doesn't have this restriction, but the web interface is a little prettier in 2007. There's really no reason to run a 32bit windows server anyway now, unless you have a specific app that requires it.
              Play hangman.

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              • #8
                Thanks for the advice.

                Now, lets talk about price. My budget is $7500. Do I have enough for Microsoft Exchange Server, Windows Server 2008 and a computer to run it?
                be free

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                • #9
                  I just talked to an HP reseller dealing with HP servers.

                  He gave me some bad news, most of which I found hard to believe.

                  First, he said that I need to purchase a license for each computer in the office ACCESSING the server, is that true!? I'm calling bullshit.

                  Second, when it comes to Microsoft Exchange Server, I am basically needing to install our email domain to the server, meaning I need to set up a line and ****?
                  be free

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                  • #10
                    I've no idea how it all works, it's for the IT monkeys at work to sort out.

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Client_Access_License
                    "The issue is there are still many people out there that use religion as a crutch for bigotry and hate. Like Ben."
                    Ben Kenobi: "That means I'm doing something right. "

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                    • #11
                      Yeah just going through wiki and microsoft now. This is becoming a lot more expensive and i'm not seeing the payoff either.

                      So what if you have an Exchange Server in office, is it really that much better than a 3rd party?

                      I guess it does do one thing - it allows you to sell the server space for $.

                      But I still think it is quite harsh to force people to purchase CAL's for each system accessing the server.


                      But to me it makes no sense. If a 3rd party company is using a Microsoft Excahnge server, and me, who has an email subscription with them, wouldn't that 3rd party company need a CAL for my subscription!?

                      edit: Just found out that's what the External Connector license is for.

                      Bloody Hell!
                      be free

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                      • #12
                        Okay calming down now. After much research I have come to this pretty satisfied conclusion:

                        1. When you buy Microsoft Server 2008, you get 10 CAL's inclusive. Which comes to SGD1758

                        I need 20 more CALS for it to be worth while, which comes to SGD1172.

                        Total = SGD2930

                        Not bad, that leaves plenty for the actual computer. I hope not to spend more than $4000. Which will leave roughly $1000.
                        be free

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                        • #13
                          Use a linux server.
                          Once you start down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny, consume you it will, as it did Obi Wan's apprentice.

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, using a Linux server in a Windows-PC network environment is an awesome idea.

                            Also consider self-castration.
                            "The issue is there are still many people out there that use religion as a crutch for bigotry and hate. Like Ben."
                            Ben Kenobi: "That means I'm doing something right. "

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                            • #15
                              Is it so bad an idea? Many Linux server applications are optimized to work with Windows clients.
                              http://www.hardware-wiki.com - A wiki about computers, with focus on Linux support.

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