Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

GeForce 8, 9, 200 GPUs get physics support for free on Aug 12th

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Asher
    replied
    No...it's just the new version of the drivers. It's not special separate software.

    If you don't want to use the functionality, you can keep upgrading drivers but turning off PhysX support: in the control panel you can choose between NVIDIA PhysX (on a GPU), PhysX card support (if present), or disable (CPU).

    I don't see why you would disable it unless it was buggy or something.

    Leave a comment:


  • snoopy369
    replied
    Is there any reason not to install it if you have only 1 GF card?

    Leave a comment:


  • Asher
    replied
    Originally posted by Tattila the Hun
    So, august 12 went... Where is it?!?

    And, does anyone know, if a really basic 8xxx-series card would actually work, like 8400Se or something, about 30 where I live?
    Don't know why they don't have it on their own site. It's been released to the download sites: http://fileforum.betanews.com/detail...it/950852325/4

    Be sure to download the right one for your system.

    Leave a comment:


  • Krill
    replied
    needs at least 256MB ram IIRC.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tattila the Hun
    replied
    So, august 12 went... Where is it?!?

    And, does anyone know, if a really basic 8xxx-series card would actually work, like 8400Se or something, about 30 where I live?

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeson
    replied
    Sounds like a standard 9800GT.

    Leave a comment:


  • Krill
    replied
    Not quite on topic, but tangentially:

    N9800GT-512MX-P RSV2 graphics card (9800GT)

    112 Stream processors@600MHz/256 bit interface
    512MB GDDR3@1800MHz

    Are those the "Normal" stats for a 9800GT? I'm asking because I can find one from a reputable buyer for 99.99 (a hell of a lot less than the expected price) and I'm thinking of just buying it to replace my 7600GT and then to add it into my next desktop as the physics card. Which is where my other question regarding this thread originates: what makes a graphics card into a good physics card?

    Leave a comment:


  • Asher
    replied
    Snow Leopard is adding OpenCL acceleration -- that's a different beast that relies on the vector processors of the graphics chip to help out. It doesn't use the dedicated video decoding logic on graphics chips, still.

    Leave a comment:


  • Whaleboy
    replied
    Agreed and it is indefensible. Bring on Snow Leopard

    http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/37868/140/

    Leave a comment:


  • Asher
    replied
    You're probably right there and since I don't use my Mac for video editing (can't be pleasant on the X3100 in the Macbook) I couldn't comment. For gaming, I'd be disingenuous by saying that anything other than a home-built Windows PC or console could compete.


    I'm not talking about video editing or gaming. I'm talking about video playback. You know, DVDs, .avis, .mkvs, .mp4s, .mov, DivX, XViD, MPEG-4, h264, MPEG-2, VC-1, .wmv, etc. In Windows, these are partially or fully accelerated by the graphics card. Nvidia and ATI fully accelerate, Intel partially.

    The end result in the real world is far lower CPU utilization (especially in HD content), longer battery life, and more system responsiveness. Apple's never bothered to add support for this, even though the hardware is in every Mac sold today...

    Leave a comment:


  • Whaleboy
    replied
    That reminds me...none of this applies to OS X. Apple still hasn't figured out how to use the video acceleration technology from 2003 graphics cards in OS X.
    Actually OS X clearly has the basis of being an awesome gaming platf....
    /Asher antagonism mode

    You're probably right there and since I don't use my Mac for video editing (can't be pleasant on the X3100 in the Macbook) I couldn't comment. For gaming, I'd be disingenuous by saying that anything other than a home-built Windows PC or console could compete.

    Leave a comment:


  • Asher
    replied
    They were working on it when Havoc was acquired.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aeson
    replied
    Didn't Havoc already run on nVidia GPU's years ago, before Intel bought up Havoc?

    Leave a comment:


  • Asher
    replied
    That reminds me...none of this applies to OS X. Apple still hasn't figured out how to use the video acceleration technology from 2003 graphics cards in OS X.

    Leave a comment:


  • Whaleboy
    replied
    Unreal Tournament 3 *orgasm*

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X