Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Theory of Evolution Should have never been a part of this game!

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • EK yes yes i know, Dinosaurs were not entirely lizardlike.

    Do we have to play the english spelling grammer game? Should i pat those on the back who showed they can profred?

    Do i have to remind you that im typing as fast i possibly can and am ignorining spelling mistakes. Why do you see mistakes in spelling and grammer a lack of intelligence? If you think that then it shows a lack of commen sense on your part.
    "Its a great day for Hockey"
    - Badger Bob Johnson -

    Comment


    • As far as the factless wonder: http://www.cstnews.com/Code/FaithEvl.html can be understood.

      Firstly it misrepresents Steven Jay Gould, who said that "The fossil record with its abrupt transitions offers no support for gradual change." Who is promoting the punctuated equilibrium model for evolution, which suggests that the majority of evolution occurs in short bursts (abrupt transitions), this is still evolution.
      Res ipsa loquitur

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Draco aka Se7eN
        An explosion is energy release.
        Energy is matter (among other things)
        Matter is life (among other things)

        Ok how many explosions have been conducted that have produced matter.
        A nuclear explosion.

        E=mc^2

        Atoms are composed of energy.

        Just because you can't see it, doesn't mean it isn't happening.

        Comment


        • What are they called then, I don't remember. My head's all fuzzy at the moment... Palentologists?


          Close enough.
          I make no bones about my moral support for [terrorist] organizations. - chegitz guevara
          For those who aspire to live in a high cost, high tax, big government place, our nation and the world offers plenty of options. Vermont, Canada and Venezuela all offer you the opportunity to live in the socialist, big government paradise you long for. –Senator Rubio

          Comment


          • I havent seen the cookies for being good yet, therefore it isnt happening

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Draco aka Se7eN
              Look i can post links too
              Your first link is useless, your second link has a once-interesting argument that is now easily debunked with new data provided by genetic algorithms, your third link is useless, and your fourth link gives the same criticisms of evolution that you've been parroting here (criticisms that have been answered by numerous posts, posts which you have chosen to ignore) while at the same time offering none of the author's supposed "evidence" for creationism.

              Try again.
              <p style="font-size:1024px">HTML is disabled in signatures :( :( :(</p>

              Comment


              • Originally posted by ALPHA WOLF 64
                I havent seen the cookies for being good yet, therefore it isnt happening
                Santa's checking his list, you've got to be patient with him. He's not as young as he used to be...
                <p style="font-size:1024px">HTML is disabled in signatures :( :( :(</p>

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Draco aka Se7eN
                  Breeding Dogs is called Microevolution. That is true.

                  You breed a dog its still a dog. would anyone like to try breeding a dog into a horse?
                  They have different numbers of chromasomes, so they can't breed. It would take an aberent genetic mutation for them to be able to breed. These do happen.

                  Comment


                  • I think the big point people miss on the creation-evolution issue is that the scientific method can ONLY deal with natural, repeatable processes. If our world came about through natural means, science can give us good answers. If not, science is practically guaranteed to mislead us because its methodology will push it to look for natural answers when the only true answers come from outside natural law.

                    Further, a supernaturally created universe could look as much or as little like it could have developed through natural means as its creator wanted it to. Depending on the creator's will, a universe created around 6000-10,000 years ago (1) could have huge numbers of discrepancies that make it virtually impossible to believe that natural processes can account for its origins, (2) could mimic a naturally evolved universe so perfectly that no conceivable scientific test could get even a hint of a discrepancy, or (3) could have characteristics anywhere in between.

                    And as if that didn't make things complex enough, both creationists and evolutionists have tricks they can pull out of their hats any time their viewpoints run up against uncomfortable data. Creationists can pull miracles out of their hats, while evolutionists can assume that natural explanations exist but just haven't been found yet or simply assume that since we're here, random chance must be able to account for things. (And, for that matter, creationists also have potential to speculate on as-yet-undiscovered or unproven natural processes.)

                    Science can do a lot to tell us where a specific concept of origins has internal flaws that have to be plugged up with miracles and/or as-yet-undiscovered natural processes. But to do a credible job of that with creation, science has to accept that creationist theories DO involve the supernatural, which means the initial state of the universe could potentially be whatever the creator wanted it to be and other miracles could have caused significant non-natural changes since then. Otherwise, science is cheating in favor of hypotheses that deny the possibility that supernatural forces were involved.

                    And before you complain that I'm demanding the impossible, if science finds it impossible to do the job right , it is obviously not an adequate tool for the job. Which takes us right back to my point at the beginning of this message: science is a grossly inadequate tool for attempting to evaluate the merits of supernatural possibilities.

                    Nathan

                    P.S. I may or may not follow this thread anymore, given its high ratio of heat to light. If you have a reply you especially want me to look at, please send me a copy privately to make sure I get it.

                    Comment


                    • DOHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

                      Comment


                      • LOL i have also read 22 books on physics. hehehe believe it or not.

                        lol this is hilarious. Im done, good bye. wont be back so all you evolutionists can do your little dance and hora like an ape man
                        "Its a great day for Hockey"
                        - Badger Bob Johnson -

                        Comment


                        • Wow, you're typing as fast as you can and ignoring mistakes? That explains why you keep consistently spelling fossils incorrectly the same way.

                          Stop lying.
                          "For it must be noted, that men must either be caressed or else annihilated; they will revenge themselves for small injuries, but cannot do so for great ones; the injury therefore that we do to a man must be such that we need not fear his vengeance." - Niccolo Machiavelli

                          Comment


                          • Just for your information... (from ArsTechnica)

                            A simplified explanation of demonstrated Quantum Electrodynamics...

                            The method of creation of the universe

                            Nanotechnology and Quantum Mechanics
                            by Geon

                            Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are movable devices manufactured on semiconductors using the same techniques used to make computer chips. They are very small (the smallest separations between their parts are on the order of micrometers). So far, classical mechanics has done a good job of guiding the design of these devices. However, in an article (subscription required for access) in the March 9, 2001 edition of Science, H. B. Chan, V. A. Aksyuk, R. N. Kleiman, D. J. Bishop, and Federico Capasso experimentally demonstrated that quantum effects become significant at such size scales.

                            Some background information may be useful, before describing the experiment. Quantum electrodynamics (the part of quantum theory dealing with electromagnetic phenomena) predicts that empty space isn't really empty, so that there is no such thing as a perfect vacuum. Even in a vacuum, and even at a temperature of absolute zero, all kinds of particles pop in and out of existence as a consequence of the famous Uncertainty Principle of quantum mechanics. These particles pop into existence (in particle-antiparticle pairs), hang around for a little while, but must then must disappear again. How long they can hang around depends on how heavy the particles are -- the heavier the particles, the faster they must disappear, but even light particles can hang around for very short periods of time. These particles are called virtual particles, because they normally can't be directly detected - you might say they almost don't exist. The only time you normally notice virtual particles is by observing their interactions with normal particles during the short time that they do hang around. As a consequence of the existence of these virtual particles, there is an energy density associated with the vacuum (remember, matter is energy, and vice-versa).

                            Now, say you take two parallel uncharged conducting plates, just for fun. Bring them very close together, and something very peculiar will start to happen. The plates will start getting sucked in towards each other (or pushed, depending on how you look at it). Virtual particles turn out to be the culprits responsible for this phenomenon. It turns out that only some virtual particles will pop into existence in between the plates. Quantum mechanics says that particles also have a wavelength. And it turns out that only particles whose wavelengths can fit a whole number of times into the gap between the plates will appear there. There is no such restriction outside the gap. As a result, the vacuum energy between the plates will be less than the vacuum energy outside the plates. And this means that the plates will be sucked together. The force pushing the plates together depends directly on the area of the plates, and inversely on the fourth power of the distance of their separation. This is called the Casimir Effect (first predicted in 1948, but not experimentally measured until 1997, due to the very small forces involved). It's not limited to parallel plates, by the way - any two conducting things close together will work. For another explanation of the Casimir Effect, have a look at the entry for it in the Usenet Physics FAQ.

                            One of the weirder things about the Casimir Effect is that the energy between the plates can be said to be negative - after all, it's less than the energy of a vacuum, which it is natural to think of as the 'zero' energy! One of the more interesting things that you need negative energy for are some of the more useful types of 'worm holes'. But that's getting off on an (interesting) tangent.

                            The experiment Chan et al. came up with is elegantly simple. They etched a 3.5 µm thick, 500 µm2 doped polysilicon square plate, anchored in the middle of two opposite sides by small rods so that the plate is free to rotate. Underneath the plate there are two electrodes, which serve as sensors. There's a space of 2 µm between the plate and the electrodes. Now, what Chan et al. wanted to measure was the Casimir Effect on this plate. It turns out that to do the experiment with two parallel plates, as described above, is not very practical, as it would be very difficult to keep the two plates parallel. Instead, they decided to measure the Casimir effect between their micromachined plate and a gold-coated Styrofoam ball (with a radius of 100 µm, for those interested). This ball was glued to a wire, and moved to distances less than 2 µ from the plate.

                            The Casimir Effect produced a torque on the plate, as the end of the plate beneath the Styrofoam ball would be sucked towards towards the ball. As a result, the plate would rotate a bit. Since this changes the distance between the plate and the electrodes beneath it (increasing the distance to one of them, and decreasing it to the other), the capacitances between the electrodes and the plate would be changed. By measuring these change in capacitance, the fact that the plate was rotating, and by how much, was measured.

                            The results closely match the theoretical predictions. According to Chan et al., the "deviation of experimental data from the theoretical Casimir force, including both the finite conductivity and surface roughness corrections, is 2.4 pN." (The 'p' stands for pico - metric shorthand for 10-12). What does all this mean? Well, for one thing, it shows that quantum mechanics must be considered in the design of MEMS, as it can have a significant effect, as proved in this experiment. And, as Chan et al. also point out, this result "could open new possibilities for novel actuation schemes in MEMS based on the Casimir force and may be important in the design of nanoelectromechanical systems." In other words, designers of future nanomachines may end up using such seemingly abstract things as virtual particles to make their creations move.


                            by Geon

                            Comment


                            • LOL i have also read 22 books on physics. hehehe believe it or not.
                              I don't, not if you don't know even know the meaning of E = MC^2.
                              <p style="font-size:1024px">HTML is disabled in signatures :( :( :(</p>

                              Comment


                              • Lol what posts, majority of what ive seen from you all is biased opinions as well
                                "Its a great day for Hockey"
                                - Badger Bob Johnson -

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X