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The Chronicles of Ambition

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  • The Chronicles of Ambition

    Hello, reasoning from my user name here, I am Guild3Master, and have a interest in storytelling. Enjoy...

    Please comment, and I appreciate if you spread the word to others if you think this piece is worthwhile to read. I'm open to suggestions, and if it sounds a obscure from Civilization 4, I'm actually starting the story like that to build up to the point of contact with other nations. Just wait and see...

    P.S: After I have worked well and thorough in this piece, I plan to make a new one based on European colonialism and the formation of America...
    Last edited by Guild3Master; May 24, 2009, 13:24.
    What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

  • #2
    The Chonicles of Ambition: The Beginning...

    The year has been set before the construction of what is now known as time, and the race of humans began to form and take effect. During those times, survival and endurance was the only purpose in life, a constant struggle. However unlike animals, the race of humans were above all, the most hopeful,the most ambitious, the most desiring...

    In the spring of the beginning of recorded time, certain figures, known for their intellect and fearlessness in battle have assembled to create a people. Back in those days, it was pack for pack. However, the humans, above all else, are the most adaptable, and have come together from regions to settle and prosper. The leaders that arose from these people, at that moment now calling themselves names to distinguish themselves from other peoples, developing a sense of brotherhood, where not content with their plaid existence.

    The Japanese, growing about in their isolated lands, were a people ignorant of what was known as the world, for they were already living in their own nightmarish landscape. The lands, divided into barbarian states, were in essence pillaging and destroying wherever things went, destroying and burning the ancient towns and villages of old. The people who fell victim could not stand such an onslaught. The remaining humans living in those lands were very much fearful, for day by day the barbarians came closer. All matter of senselessness would come to an end. Ieyasu Tokugawa, born himself from a ruined village, ran forth one day and single handedly defeated a raging mass of barbarians now attacking his new homestead in the town of Edo. At the cost of full body movement, he struck each and every invader down. When the carnage ended, the people of his land, unarmed for this attack looked up to the now crippled Tokugawa. And there, he would start his hold...

    To be Continued...
    What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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    • #3
      Gathering an Army...

      At those times, there was no theory of God or gods, but more of a sense of Mysticism, a greater spirit created to watch over Earth, her sprites, and here dominion. The witness of Tokugawa's struggle thought tat at last, the time has come that the greater spirit has sent a warrior to the defense of the peoples. On that day, Tokugawa would unite the free peoples of Japan in victory over the Barbarian hordes...

      At the top of a mountain, the Japanese army looked nothing more than a disorganized mob of farmers, peasants, and herders. He could also see the entire expanse of his control, only a few villages. At best for the moment, he thought, that the only chance to organize into a more organized unit is to abandon the cities he believed were too far to properly defend, giving him more free reign of his arms. He then sent the few who had any experience in battle to train and rally the forces. Without weapons, he called the all of the economy in his villages to focus on food production and weapons manufacturing. They have not yet come in contact with the strange substance with metal, so they had to make due with stone and wood. Tasking the villagers to prepare fortifications, walls, palisades, and keeps were constructed.

      Conveniently, the only passage inside from the North was a small pass from which the city of Iki is located on, namely called the Kuzagawa pass. Also expeditious is the fact that it was already surrounded by walls and fortifications. The barbarian wave that attacked Edo slipped through these fortifications. Tokugawa's army, ranging to about 1000, entered the city of 7,000, and took positions on it's outskirts. Why is it Tokugawa is leading the armies outside the citadel? This is because Tokugawa doesn't want to draw attention to his plans of a unified army. The Barbarians would assume the force he already commands came from the fleeing villagers. The Barbarian armies, armed with bronze, ranging to about 2000, were planning to cross the river that buffered Kuzagawa and establish a base camp just outside.

      The first battle of Kuzagawa is about to begin...
      Last edited by Guild3Master; April 25, 2009, 23:35.
      What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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      • #4
        Great start and welcome to Apolyton!

        Let us know if you would like any feedback on your stories, we're more than happy to help you improve!
        First Master, Banan-Abbot of the Nana-stary, and Arch-Nan of the Order of the Sacred Banana.
        Marathon, the reason my friends and I have been playing the same hotseat game since 2006...

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        • #5
          Good stuff. Style is a little epic, but then the birth of a coherent civilization is an epic tale, in fact.
          No matter where you go, there you are. - Buckaroo Banzai
          "I played it [Civilization] for three months and then realised I hadn't done any work. In the end, I had to delete all the saved files and smash the CD." Iain Banks, author

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          • #6
            Thank you... and I shall continue my tale then...
            What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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            • #7
              The Battle of Kuzagawa: Battleplans

              When many think of barbarians, they see them off as ravagers and pillagers, unorganized, but on the contrary, there is more than meets the eye, for barbarians, in this account, are just considered foreigners to the region, and so, catching wind of an organized revolt against them, the barbarian leaders rallied thousands of armies to finally wrest control of the lands of Iki and Edo.

              Tokugawa, on his steed, does not have the full support of the people. Success doesn't come from on victory, but many. And even victories are very unimportant if there is much loss. The people of Iki, if one has noticed, has stayed behind their walls instead of fighting. The leaders of that fortified citadel, though not showing resentment in Tokugawa's actions (hope is low, and none would like to see another war at hand), has also shunned Tokugawa from their hold. Tokugawa's goal: drive back the barbarian hordes without losing face. One could assume the overwhelming number of foes lining against Tokugawa's meager regiment, but it also must be understood that if a leader is to lead, then he must show he is a leader willing to sacrifice himself. And if it comes to sacrifice, then it must come through wither an iron fist or strong military ingenuity.

              Tokugawa knows that if it comes to melee, he will surely lose. His army is relatively outdated and not well armoured compared to their foes. However, as barbarians culminate, time comes as a valuable friend. Tokugawa's strategy: A river runs beneath a valley, creating a flood plain, which was once turned into a farm, but now reverted into ruin. Next to it are tall grasses and well concealed and protected mountain ledges. The plan is to stick sharped spears/wooden staffs and sticks into the ground near and in the shallow river, for barbarians have to wade in it in order to cross. Where wild grain grows lay fortifications and obstacles to hinder the attackers while hundreds of bowmen and stone slingers in the concealed rocks and wheat fire at the now very slowly advancing units hindered by the obstacles, fortifications, barb traps, wet and soft soil and sand, water, and now arrows. To top that, as a last resort before melee, the fields of green would be set ablaze and kill any stragglers.

              The last fortress of Iki stands anon the coming sunrise, the last fortress of the free Japanese before the lands of Edo. The barbarian movement has destroyed all in its path. Will it stop here?...

              To be Continued...
              What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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              • #8
                The Battle of Kuzagawa: Allies

                The barbarian forces, looming off in the sunset, blood red, have made their way down the the banks of the shallow body of water. The barb traps laid were well concealed, and so as the barbarian soldiers started moving in, they were effectively stabbed and crippled. The basic strategy assumption is to have the most armoured soldiers in the brigade to move out first, being the most protected and most experienced, and so also protecting the archers from behind from harm.

                Now the barbarian footmen, though moving closer and closer into Tokugawa's trap, only assumed these stone and wooden spikes stick from the river bed and banks were remnants of a raid that they conducted much earlier. Though shallow, the river was quite wide, and in a bit of time, a good chunk of the enemy were wading in the river, distracted be the soft mud and sediment, obstacles, and jagged spikes, were now nearing closer into the tall grass and foliage. Every soldier strung their bows and readied their spears and axes. Effectively, what happened right after world wipe out the forward advance.

                As I said before, the front line barbarian soldiers were the most experienced, and so when arrows twang, they fell. Soon another wave of arrows followed in pursuit and struck flanks upon flanks of enemy infantry, in essence mowing them down. Before the barbarians would react once more with their remaining numbers, a volley from the hills and rocks struck down most of the remaining. Had barbarians been more conscious about their comrades, they would have taken off. But instead, a new advance moved in and took cover in the very obstacles put in place to hinder them. A response in arrows was initiated, and few were knocked off their feet as the rest of the Japanese archers jumped and ran for cover.

                Instead of being a quick victory, as each leader from every opposing side hoped, it would be a battle long drawn into the night. An arrow would fly, then hit and miss, and another would be fired back in response. One thing was for certain that there were heavy losses for the barbarians. A daring chance at a rush to attack the archers from their enemy's boundaries, proved fruitful, and they were slain. That would only mean, however, of the sheer mass of numbers the barbarians had. Losing a tenth from 10,000 isn't all bad. Losing a tenth of 1000 however is much more serious.

                People don't take fortresses like Iki with axes, swords, arrows, and spears. They are taken with either starvation (which didn't seem relevant with the barbarians, for they disliked waiting.) or the use of siege weapons, namely battering rams hoisted on armored carts. In this epic battle, the arbarians soon improvised to use it not as siege weapons, but as mini moving keeps, rolling along to kill without being harmed. As these things started to move upriver (unaffected by the barb traps and carrying 7 barbarians a piece), they were unimpeded by arrows fired from Japanese bowmen and soon crashed through Japanese fortifications. They soon unloaded, and having an open shot at weak bodied peasants, the foot soldiers soon cut all of them down. The rest of the barbarian warriors on foot moved and joined with the siege rams and starting wreaking their own havoc.

                By the time midnight passed, Tokugawa's forces were sized down into less than half of what he started with and signaled for a retreat to the walls. This is the account:

                "My lord, our lines have been overrun and we are losing ground." (Messenger)
                "Total dead?" (Tokugawa)
                "I don't know, but at this time, I think... less than half remain. (Messenger)
                "Fire Another volley for cover and retreat to the wall. We will hold there..." (Tokugawa)....
                "Yes...uh!" *thud... bleeding, dead on ground, arrow shaft in his heart.*
                (Messenger)
                "D--- it!. Set the fields on fire! They will pay for this transgression." *Arrows ringing through the air; screams.*

                Meanwhile, on the walls , general Sakai of Iki looks on the battlefield in contempt and fear...

                To be Continued...
                What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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                • #9
                  The Battle of Kuzagawa: The Rising Sun

                  As Tokugawa's forces are increasingly cornered by the barbarian onslaught, general Sakai Hoshigake looks on.

                  Before the battle, as Tokugawa's forces moved in to place, general Sakai advocated to aid Tokugawa's lines with fresh new soldiers. The high command abruptly said no. Sakai is a man a greatness who has just recently felt the sting of defeat and failure and the surrounding lands in the North and beyond are taken. Tokugawa to the command seemed young and foolish. Who would rally to him to lead the people to fight on such overwhelming odds? As the battle started turning in clear favor of the barbarian soldiers, Sakai wonders if the decision was a mistake.

                  Elsewhere, on the battlefield, the now demoralized Japanese army under Tokugawa's command have started to pull back. On the top of the hill, as little soldiers like ants began scurrying around, fire-tipped arrows were brought up. Here is an account of what happened:

                  "Quickly, when ready, fire at will on the grasses..." (Tokugawa)
                  "Sir, but what about the rest of the men who haven't fled down?" (Bowman)
                  "We can't wait for them, lest the barbarians destroy the entire brunt of our forces. Fire when ready!" (Tokugawa)

                  Indeed, there was no time to wait. Chaos wreaked havoc, with allied bodies who haven't fallen were falling right now. There was no chance to save the lot of them. And so in effect of the advancing barbarian waves and the threat of anytime, the barbarians could rush through the grass and inadvertently foil the last maneuver, The fire-tipped arrows were flung and landed into the the dry grass.

                  There was a high wind tonight, and so this part of the plan was in due part very successful. The flames quickly spread, and soon charred, anything and anyone in its grasp. And so hundreds upon hundreds of barbarian warriors fell, overcome by the heat.

                  Tokugawa's lines were about less now that 200 men, and the barbarians still topped off with 500, unaffected by the fires because they resided as reserves from the opposite bank, which was untouched. As the flames started to settle down, the reserves quickly charged to meet the retreating Japanese forces. Tokugawa, in response, fired another volley with very minimal effect and soon joined his comrades for a final showdown.

                  With the fires sweeping through the fields and scouts reporting on Tokugawa's movements, he immediately thought of him as a brilliant commander, the only one who could unite the free Japanese people in rebellion against the barbarian movement. In defiance of the city council's resolution, he quickly gathered his men under his guide, (about 2000) and marched them up the slopes of the battle. As soon as the barbarians culminated for a last direct frontal assault (many were still busy killing off stragglers), the men of Iki fired a barrage of arrows that pierced the flanks of the forward troops, and soon followed that up with a Calvary spear flank which cut through the enemy infantry like butter. Tokugawa, seeing the opportunity rallied the men of his own and charged at the distracted remnants of the barbarian onslaught and, together, the men of Iki and the men of Edo finally won victory as the sun rose off in the distance, signaling morning...

                  To be Continued...
                  What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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                  • #10
                    YEAHHRRRGH! Rising Sun!
                    First Master, Banan-Abbot of the Nana-stary, and Arch-Nan of the Order of the Sacred Banana.
                    Marathon, the reason my friends and I have been playing the same hotseat game since 2006...

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                    • #11
                      3000th post!
                      First Master, Banan-Abbot of the Nana-stary, and Arch-Nan of the Order of the Sacred Banana.
                      Marathon, the reason my friends and I have been playing the same hotseat game since 2006...

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                      • #12
                        A Need for More than Stone or Steed...

                        At the end of the battle, the war-hardened commanders were discussing about the events that lead to this fateful encounter as they headed off with the remainder of their men into Iki.

                        After Sakai's disobedience of the council's orders, (The council now thought of Sakai as a traitor because of his reckless actions. It would focus the barbarians to focus their gaze on Iki. However, the "Battle of Kuzagawa" could also be renamed the "Battle for Iki" do to the fact that both parties, Tokugawa's and the barbarians', both wanted control of it through different methods and different reasons) Sakai and the returning party, so few of men (from Tokugawa's ranks) , were surprised to hear cheers of praise and worship as they entered the gates. There were many sympathizers to Tokugawa's cause in Iki, but that was only the cause. Tokugawa must prove he was a leader of courage and brilliance if he was to sway their hearts, and he managed to succeed that. Sakai was not the only one looking over the walls and onward to the battle. In fact, the situation escalated far beyond mere words. Revolution begun shortly after victory for the free Japanese became eminent. Foolish as the high council of Iki might of thought of Tokugawa and Sakai, but they soon lost their voice, or their say in that matter, and now the people were to designate Tokugawa as their leader.

                        They were inspired by the exact moment at when the battle was won, when all was hopeless and lost, the rising sun appeared and the Japanese managed to prevail. Mysticism and symbolism plays out in the hearts and minds of those people, and so the now united forces of the men of Edo and Iki were to be united under the banner of the Rising Sun.

                        From the chambers of castles looming over the rest of Iki, Sakai, Tokugawa, and the other field officers were discussing the best way to go on in advancing as well as defending. Though men have now lined up, reaching almost 10,000 from all the surrounding lands, there was a matter on how to defend their cities, what to attack, how to keep them going, and more importantly, how to better arm and armour them. From the very beginning, that had been a problem. The barbarians, unlike them, were well armed. In that era, when on the battlefield, the only ways to feign death was to desert (which was not guaranteed, and when found, were killed quickly by the enemy, or worse killed slowly by their commanding superior), have enough skill (which was rare), or use armour. However, they had no viable source of metal,the substance used to craft hard shells (except in the stores of Iki, which will of course not last long).

                        A messenger came in to the quarters to deliver news. Tokugawa descended with Sakai into the halls where they were met by a stranger from another land. Here is an account:

                        "Who are you that enter here with such finery?" *glancing at his armor.* (Tokugawa)
                        "Speak or die, are you barbarian or... Reply!" *drawing and fumbling with his sword.* (Sakai)
                        "I... am Masonori Fukushima of Iwagakure no Sato... I see you are in a bit of a predicament, and so am I. Help me, and I will in turn lend my aid to your cause..." (Fukushima)

                        What is the meaning of this person's arrival?

                        To be Continued...
                        Last edited by Guild3Master; May 24, 2009, 18:41.
                        What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Iwagakure no Sato

                          "What aid do you have in mind?" (Tokugawa)
                          "Iwagakure no Sato, the Village Hidden Among the Rocks, will supply you, Lord Tokugawa, things that you much need and desire to continue your causing in advancing further toward your goals..." (Fukushima)
                          "Just spit it out!" (Sakai)"
                          "...an amplified supply of well trained men and access to my mines and stores of bronze metal." (Fukushima)

                          As I have stated before, the free Japanese army under the banner of the Rising Sun were without bronze. Instead of slicing and hacking on the battlefield on the next eve, there would be shattering, breaking, and screaming (well, I guess you could say it would be slicing and hacking... for the barbarians of course). As such, without the aid of bronze to replace their obsolete stone and wood weapons and armour (which, at the moment, was basically a cloth to protect them from the elements) they would have to rely on the same thing which helped them win the Battle of Kuzagawa, which in that case was a prefect defense spot, natural obstacles, traps, hundreds upon hundreds of reinforcements... well a miracle. Anyway, Tokugawa also suspected that it would not be long before another barbarian inclusion would occur, and this would be the prefect chance to prepare for the worst and, hopefully launch a counter attack. However, the leader of Iwagakure did say that he must be helped too.

                          Here is the finished account of this:

                          "I could see some hope in troubled expressions, but hope is worth dirt nowadays without a weapon at hand... and so on that note, I would like you to retake back my city..." (Fukushima)
                          *instantly saddened* "What do you mean by 'retake back your city'?" (Sakai)

                          The city of Iwagakure is a grand, fortified metropolis by which its name implies: hidden among the rocks (or walls... both are made by stone). The people there are great craftsman, blacksmiths, and miners who dig and break through mountains and create tunnels in which to find material and wealth to bring back into the light to be smelted, traded, or used for useful purposes. Besides the immense mining operations and walls, the people have also developed land for pasturing, fishing, (from the mountain springs) , and pasturing, bringing up a powerful self-sufficient economy with an even more powerful military. No barbarian could even attempt at taking the site without first either breaking though the walls and defeating the residing army, or poisoning the water supply (which was luckily very far out of touch from barbarian hands, located deep inside the mountains, as well as on the surface, hence mountain springs). The rulers that guided the city over its development and prosperity, including Fukushima, were all benevolent and wise in their work.

                          With such a massive and powerful city, how did Fukushima, the former steward and lord, get ousted out and the city fall? Was it through barbarians?

                          To be Continued...
                          Last edited by Guild3Master; May 1, 2009, 00:56.
                          What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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                          • #14
                            Guild3Master is a machine!
                            First Master, Banan-Abbot of the Nana-stary, and Arch-Nan of the Order of the Sacred Banana.
                            Marathon, the reason my friends and I have been playing the same hotseat game since 2006...

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                            • #15
                              Treachery

                              By the looks of the land, Iwagakure has not fallen from its grace. The people of the land generally consider Fukushima to be a noble leader, as noble as he is skilled in warfare. In fact, noble enough to look over the village nearby to waste by the on going pillaging of the barbarians for the welfare of his citizens. Yet he was noble still to let in the refugees who fled that village and beyond under his protection. Even though the city was pretty much invulnerable to the usual barbarian city, all thanks in part to his grandeur military and defense, it would still be unwise to declare full pronounced war, lest he draws attention upon the hordes.

                              I have told this before... barbarians aren't really the mindless savages that many people think they are, drinking at taverns one night, and then destroying it the next day just to burn it down. It be more accurate to say if they burned it the next day in order to not throw out their due for their dew. Same thing goes with raiding parties.

                              Barbarians just don't go and charge all at once, perhaps in what would turn into a mad suicide rush. Instead, they go through the tactic of organized warfare, which was pretty useful in their rampage against the heavily populated cities of central Japan. In fact, there are rumors that these barbarians are actually headed by by something, or someone, an ultimate power wielding foe with immense control over the many numerous and warlike nature of the barbarian soldiers and brilliance beyond compare, and that this mysterious figure lead the charge in what would be the fall of the great capital of Kyoto, but yet those are just rumors.

                              Barbarians, in their civilized revelation, have also used other ways in order to bring lands under their control, such as diplomacy. And so, the commanding officer, Ban Mitasuri, was persuaded by means of diplomacy to use his resources and means to start off a coup d' etat and securing the grand citadel for the barbarians through the guise of protection and with imprisoned, killed, or exiled any dissidents to his new role as supervisor.

                              Knowing this may be his only chance for much needed weapons, Tokugawa accepts and follows Fukushima, leaving Sakai behind at Iki to guard Kuzagawa while he and his 7000 man army deals with troubles in the east. Meeting off in rendezvous with the exiles, about 17,000 soldiers (who left willingly though they outnumbered Ban's men in order to prevent a civil war) in a direct assault against the gates of Iwagakure no Sato, the Village Hidden Behind the Rocks.

                              To Be Continued...
                              What difference does it make to the dead, the orphans and the homeless, whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy? (Mahatma Gandhi)

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