Support an Apolyton OT that advertisers flee in terror from: Buy Stuff from Amazon (UK, CA, FR, DE). You know you were going to buy it anyway.
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Not Only is KH a Bad Tipper, He's Plain Unethical As Well

  1. #1
    DaShi
    Emperor DaShi's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Sep 2000
    Location
    The Taste of Japan
    Posts
    8,569
    Country
    This is DaShi's Country Flag
    Thanks
    615
    Thanked 263 Times in 197 Posts
    Local Date
    December 20, 2014
    Local Time
    00:55

    Wink Not Only is KH a Bad Tipper, He's Plain Unethical As Well

    http://arstechnica.com/science/news/...ts-it-does.ars

    In this week's PNAS, researchers at UC Berkeley and the University of Toronto tackle a topic that is bound to spark controversy. I'll let the title speak for itself: "Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior." The paper describes the results of seven studies—two field studies and five experimental tests—that sought to explore how socioeconomic status (SES) correlates with behavior that most of us would consider ethical.

    Trying to reason out the impact of social status could send you running in circles. Could lower SES motivate individuals towards increased unethical behavior as a result of fewer resources and greater threat and uncertainty? Alternately, might higher SES and the greater resources and freedom that brings result in relaxed ethical attitudes? To figure out what was going on, the researchers performed a mix of controlled and real-world experiments.

    The first two studies looked at whether SES could predict driving behavior, using the make, age, and appearance of vehicles as a marker for SES. (In other words, shiny new BMWs were assumed to be driven by high-status individuals.) The first looked at whether SES affected a driver's tendency to cut off other vehicles at a busy four-way stop in the San Francisco Bay Area. Even when controlled for time of day, the driver's perceived sex and age, and traffic, high SES individuals were significantly more likely to cut off other drivers.

    The same effect was apparent when they looked at if SES affected whether a driver was more likely to cut off pedestrians at a crosswalk. Higher SES individuals were significantly more likely to do so.

    Next, the researchers turned to controlled experiments. Participants were asked to read different scenarios of people unrightfully benefiting or taking something. Then they were asked how likely they would be to do the same thing. High SES participants were significantly more likely to report that they would engage in these unethical behaviors.

    Study number four involved participants rating themselves on the SES scale to heighten their perception of status; they were then answered a number of questions relating to unethical behavior. At the end of the experiment, they were presented with a jar of individually wrapped candy and told that, although it was for children in a nearby lab, they could take some if they wanted. At this point you might be able to guess what the results were. High SES participants took more candy.

    Attitudes toward greed were also examined. Study participants role-played a salary negotiation, acting as the employer. They were told before the negotiation that the job in question would would actually be eliminated in the near future. High SES participants were significantly less likely to be truthful about job stability, and significantly more likely to have favorable attitudes towards greed even when controlled for age, sex, ethnicity, religiosity, and political orientation.

    The next study gave its participants the chance to cheat. The researchers let them play a computer game of chance (five rolls of a six-sided die), and asked them to report the results. Players were told them that they had an increased chance of a cash prize if they had higher scores, even though the game was actually fixed such that the total scores would always add up to 12. High SES positively predicted cheating, even when controlled in the same ways as the previous study.

    The final test looked at whether encouraging positive attitudes towards greed would increase unethical tendencies in lower SES participants. These subjects were either neutrally primed by being asked to list three things about their day, or were positively primed by being asked to list three benefits of greed. Next, their attitude towards greed was assessed, and they were also questioned about their tendency to engage in unethical behavior at work (stealing, accepting bribes, overcharging).

    By this point, you'll almost certainly surmise that positive priming for greed significantly increased favorable attitudes towards it, as well as unethical work behavior. Additionally, the higher a participant's SES, the more positive their attitudes were towards greed, and the greater chance they engaged in unethical behavior.

    The researchers argue that "the pursuit of self-interest is a more fundamental motive among society's elite, and the increased want associated with greater wealth and status can promote wrongdoing." However, they point out that their findings aren't absolute, and that philanthropic efforts such as those of Bill Gates and Warren Buffet buck the observed trend, as does research which has shown a relationship between poverty and violent crime.
    Can anyone get a "borrowed" copy of the PNAS article?
    “As a lifelong member of the Columbia Business School community, I adhere to the principles of truth, integrity, and respect. I will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.”
    "Capitalism ho!"

  2. #2
    Oncle Boris
    Emperor Oncle Boris's Avatar
    Join Date
    02 Aug 2001
    Posts
    5,310
    Country
    This is Oncle Boris's Country Flag
    Thanks
    91
    Thanked 27 Times in 20 Posts
    Local Date
    December 19, 2014
    Local Time
    19:55
    It could be that people of lower status are more likely to pay the consequences of unethical behavior, and thus develop a reluctance.
    "The boastful seeks the company of parasites." (Spinoza)

  3. #3
    Boris Godunov
    Emperor Boris Godunov's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Aug 2001
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    6,489
    Country
    This is Boris Godunov's Country Flag
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 22 Times in 20 Posts
    Local Date
    December 19, 2014
    Local Time
    16:55
    PNAS?

    *snicker*
    Tutto nel mondo è burla

  4. #4
    DaShi
    Emperor DaShi's Avatar
    Join Date
    29 Sep 2000
    Location
    The Taste of Japan
    Posts
    8,569
    Country
    This is DaShi's Country Flag
    Thanks
    615
    Thanked 263 Times in 197 Posts
    Local Date
    December 20, 2014
    Local Time
    00:55
    I wonder if there is a difference between those who earned their wealth and those who simple inherited it.


    Wo ba shi Li Gang!
    “As a lifelong member of the Columbia Business School community, I adhere to the principles of truth, integrity, and respect. I will not lie, cheat, steal, or tolerate those who do.”
    "Capitalism ho!"

Similar Threads

  1. Now that's just plain mean
    By Wezil in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: November 23, 2010, 20:29
  2. Just plain weird...
    By jrregan in forum Civilization IV General
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 4, 2009, 13:36
  3. just. plain. STUPID.
    By Kaak in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 245
    Last Post: July 21, 2005, 11:25
  4. This is just plain cruelty.
    By MrFun in forum Off-Topic-Archive
    Replies: 53
    Last Post: August 8, 2003, 15:16
  5. Pornography: unethical?
    By Urban Ranger in forum Off-Topic-Archive
    Replies: 117
    Last Post: June 12, 2003, 04:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions